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National Police Week - May 9-15, 2021

Nearly 60 years ago, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation designating May 15 as Peace Officer's Memorial Day and the week in which it falls as National Police Week. Established by a joint resolution of Congress in 1962, National Police Week pays special recognition to those law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others.

This year, National Police Week will be commemorated with virtual events that can be viewed from anywhere in the world. From May 9-15, the National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum will deliver programs to keep current officers safe and healthy, as well as ceremonies to honor those fallen officers whose names have been recently added to the Memorial.

Since January 91 Police Officers have been shot across the United States, with 19 killed by gunfire and 23 shot in ambushes. Even more eye opening is that 60,632 police officers were assaulted in 2018 (the most recent year for statistics). This past year, 5 Parsons Officers were assaulted and injured in the course of making lawful arrests.

The average size of an American police agency is just 25 officers. That is where the meat and potatoes of American policing occurs day in and day out. Policing in small towns is no less dangerous than in large metropolitan areas (in fact statistics show that the risk to police officers in small rural communities is actually greater than in the downtowns of most metro-cities). The difference is that in cities like Parsons, Independence, Coffeyville and hundreds of others, local police officers are active and engaged members of the communities and neighborhoods they police.

The police are you. And the community is responsible for policing their city by engaging in crime prevention (lights, locking doors, reporting suspicious activity), providing necessary resources for professional policing and in owning the livability of their town.

No question, we have seen some illegal, unprofessional, and discouraging acts by a small fraction of the policing community over the past year. Those actions have to be condemned by professional law enforcement and our larger community. Fortunately, our ever-evolving Parsons Police Department continues to lead in meeting regional, state, and national expectations for our work. We are an award-winning police department that is committed to continuous improvement. We have made significant investments in the transparency of our organization.

There is of course much to do - our community is a busy town. Merely making arrests will not solve some of our deep seating community challenges of domestic violence, drug addiction and people in crisis. But we remain open to partnering with all facets of our community. We all live here, we all call Parsons's home, and we will continue in our efforts to WOW our fellow neighbors, friends and Parsonians.

 


AWARD WINNING!

AWARD WINNING!

Yes, your Parsons Police Department is an award-winning law enforcement agency. Recently, I was asked what awards we have received - great question.

Traffic Safety Award

AAA Awards Logo.JPG 

The American Automobile Association (AAA) has a nationwide traffic safety program that recognizes law enforcement agencies that have a combination of community outreach or education, engineering, and enforcement activities with the goal of reducing crashes in their communities.

For the past five years the Parsons Police Department has been an award-winning agency. In 2020, the Department received the AAA Platinum Award. AAA defines this as: Platinum Awards are given to communities that have documented new, perhaps innovative, traffic safety programs, projects, or initiatives for the previous year. These communities have also demonstrated outstanding success with high scores in all scoring categories.

The Parsons Police Department is one of 43 law enforcement agencies - comprising 32 police departments and 11 sheriff's offices - throughout the state that were honored with AAA Kansas Community Traffic Safety Awards for our 2020 work to keep roadways safe through a variety of initiatives and programs, despite the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Only 26 of the 43 agencies achieved the Platinum status that Parsons did (20 were police departments). There are 371 law enforcement agencies in the State of Kansas.

The awards have been presented annually since 2011 by AAA Kansas to community law enforcement agencies for their efforts to foster and improve local traffic safety successfully and cost-effectively. The agencies are scored and recognized for their efforts in multiple categories, including education, emergency medical response, enforcement and traffic engineering collaborations and solutions.

Excellence in Policy & Training Management

Your Parsons Police Department was also awarded Gold Award Status by Lexipol LLC for Excellence in Policy & Training Management. The program uses metrics that look at the operating policies of the agency, quick policy modifications due to law or court decisions, participation in a daily training bulletin training program, the percentage of staff that have completed the DTB process over the past year and validation that policies have been reviewed and signed off by staff.

Parsons was only one out of 17,985 local law enforcement agencies nationwide. Of those roughly 4,500 were qualified to be a participant in the Lexipol evaluation. Nationwide less than 400 agencies received the Gold Award Status. This equates to Parsons PD being in the top 2.2% of agencies nationwide and in the Top 9% of agencies qualified to participate in the evaluation program nationwide.

What are the Recognition Levels?

Lexipol Award Performance Levels.png

This is how Parsons PD rated:

Lexipol Performance Metrics.png

As you can see, Parsons PD far exceeded the minimum requirements for the Gold status.

Parsons Police Annual Report is a Winner!

Another area that the agency received praise from was part of the 2019/20 CRI-TAC Grant that was administered by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) from the Department of Justice (DOJ). During the exit interview with the team from IACP in reviewing our community outreach efforts, and in developing a community survey (that will be administered later in 2021), the agency was complemented on our Annual Report. We were told that our Annual Report was one of the best in the nation in its thoroughness, transparency, and depth of information.

Annual Reports are not statutorily mandated, but they are the report to the community on work volume, crime rates, arrest and traffic data, crash information, use of force reporting and offer accountability and transparency to the stakeholders of a community - our citizens.

Of course, these awards and other achievements of your police department can occur only through the hard work of the officers and staff of the Parsons Police Department.

 


Partnerships in Parsons: Yes, It Works!

Not quite 3-years ago when I arrived in Parsons, our town was a different place. But, change and evolution is not something that you can stop, even if we'd like those 'good old days' that exist only in our memories.

Policing in Parsons and throughout our region has gotten more challenging and more dangerous over my tenure as Chief of Police. That has meant that developing partnerships and policing smarter has become critical.

For our part, you see some of the best partnerships in policing happening locally. The Labette County Sheriff's Office, Parsons PD, and County Attorney's Office as well as the Juvenile Department and our federal partners (US Marshal's Office, Drug Enforcement Administration) along with the Kansas Bureau of Investigation share information, partner in programming, and investigations and are tied together through our Kansas - Combined Anti-Drug Taskforce (K-CAT).

Sounds like simple common sense doesn't it?

That cooperation is not always alive in all areas of the country. The idea that a Sheriff's Deputy and a city police officer would share 'common ground' as we do in Parsons is the exception and not the rule across the country. Sure personalities, politics - those things impact the criminal justice system just like they do in life in general. Fortunately, that has not been the case in recent years here in Parsons and in Labette County. Labette County Sheriff Darren Eichinger and County Attorney Stephen Jones have been instrumental in working with, listening to, and developing new partnerships that reach throughout SE Kansas to enhance the criminal justice system.

I have had a unique policing career covering four-decades, I've worked in all three of the west coast states as well as in metropolitan and rural venues that have also includes airport, seaport, and railroad operations. I jumped into University policing as a Chief for 6 more years in Louisiana. Needless to say, I've been exposed to all levels of the criminal justice system. Here in Labette County, today - we have some of the best inter-agency relationships, information sharing, and investigative successes ever seen in Labette County. Regardless of big cities or rural venues - things are working, even with strained budgets, in our County. Sheriff Eichinger and County Attorney Jones are not one's to self-promote, but they are the lynch pins in our areas many successes.

A recent drug interdiction effort that resulted in multiple arrests included a team of Parsons PD, Labette Sheriffs, KBI Agents and Chanute PD K-9 Teams.  We are collaborating on training and technology with our other partner police agencies of Independence (Chief Jerry Harrison), Coffeyville (Chief Kwin Bromley) and Pittsburg (Chief Brent Narges) and we want to grow those relationships even more. Without this cross jurisdictional support and teamwork, well things are just more dangerous.

Locally our Department has increased transparency with a new web site that provides a massive amount of information about policing, crime data, prevention tips, podcasts and so much more. You can sign up to receive alerts by text or email. Please visit us at www.parsonspd.com . The COVID-19 Pandemic had us rely more upon social media platforms such as Twitter and www.NextDoor.com . The results have been overwhelmingly successful.

Citizens can't sit on the sideline. Thirty-five years ago, a national campaign was birthed that introduced McGruff the Crime Dog as an American icon that is "taking a bite out of crime."

In the early 1970s, most people thought it was strictly up to law enforcement to prevent crime. However, a group of concerned private citizens and government leaders believed that working individually and collectively, in tandem with the police, could aid in crime prevention.

Since his debut, McGruff has been instrumental in showing adults and youth alike how their involvement can reduce crime. Today more than three out of four Americans believe they can personally do something to prevent crimes from occurring. While crime in general has been reduced from the highs seen in the 1990s, it remains a reality in communities across the nation every day, including Parsons. To this end, it is clear that even with a more diverse, older, technology savvy nation, McGruff the Crime Dog still has a job to do.

In the past quarter-century, McGruff has become more than just a familiar face. He is a true piece of Americana.  We can all "Take A Bite Out of Crime." For more information about the National Crime Prevention Coalition, visit www.ncpc.org. Locally, we have seen a huge increase in citizen participation by adopting our motor of 'See It! Hear It! Report It! Check out the crime prevention and information resources available on-line at the Parsons Police Department's web site at; www.parsonspd.com


Robbery Prevention Tips

Armed Robbery Graphic

Robbery Prevention

Dating back to 1829 (Robert Peele), the police are the public and the public are the police. Law enforcement officers today are merely individuals who focus on policing on a full-time basis, but the community is still responsible in making the city safe. Policing in America has always been a shared responsibility. Unfortunately, that shared responsibility is sometimes forgotten with people thinking they no longer must be engaged, participate, or take responsibility for community safety.

In recent days there has been an armed robbery of a local short-term loan store and a grocery store pharmacy. Those investigations are on-going. Crime continues around us as well in Coffeyville, Independence, Pittsburg . . . Parsons doesn't have a corner on the crime market in our region. But, let's discuss some useful prevention methods - if you have a business then these are worthwhile points for you to review and implement.

Robbery is a crime against your person rather than against your property. If someone breaks into your home or business and takes property from the premises, the crime is called a burglary. However, if you are confronted by an individual on the street or in your home, car or business and force is used or threatened against you, you have become the victim of a robbery.

It is important to remember two things:

  •    Robbers want one thing - your money or property - and they want it quickly. 
  •    Robbery is a risky business and robbers are usually nervous. You do not want to delay a robbery in any way and increase the potential for violence. Give the robber what he or she wants and do it quickly. Do not risk your life, or another person's life, for property.

Be Alert

  •    Robberies occur at predictable times. Opening and closing periods are particularly vulnerable times due to low staffing and large amounts of cash on hand. Lunch hours are primary times for the same reasons. Robberies increase during the holiday season due to the increased cash volume and the presence of large crowds that distract and preoccupy store and company personnel.
  •    Report suspicious activity. If you observe an individual, or occupied vehicle, lingering around your business for a time, or in a manner that makes you suspicious or uncomfortable, write down the license number, color of the car and description of the individual(s) and call the police non-emergency number (620-421-7060). Be sure to inform other employees of your suspicion.

Visibility

  •    Good visibility allows employees to be aware of suspicious activities outside the store. It also increases the chance passersby will observe robberies taking place inside the store.
  •    Keep doors and windows clear. Post any necessary signs to the side, top or bottom of the display windows to allow maximum visibility into and out of the store. This will help customers see your merchandise too.
  •    Locate the cash register in a central place. Keep it in clear view of the door, with the customer's back to the entrance. The register should be visible from the outside.
  •    Keep counter displays low. This allows employees to see over the top. You can also rearrange displays to allow surveillance up and down both sides of each aisle.
  •    Place wide-angle mirrors in strategic locations. This will assist with visibility in blind areas of the store.
  •   Always make sure interior lighting provide good visibility in the store. Outdoor lighting should be even and directed toward the sides of the building, not outward where glare can create hiding places for robbers.

 

Cash Control

  •    Do not keep unnecessary amounts of money in the till. Keep only the amount you will need to conduct normal business and transfer the rest to the bank or a safe. Provide an anchored drop-vault for employees and do not provide them with the key to the safe. Post the fact that you use a drop-vault and, therefore, cannot make change for large denominations.
  •    Drop all checks and food stamps. Allow customers to see you do this and explain why. Ask customers for exact change or the smallest bills possible.
  •    During the evening, take even greater precautions. Check to see that outside lights are on and working. In money order sales, collect money and make your drop before printing the money order. Open unused register drawers and tip them for display.
  •    Make trips to the bank often, varying travel times and routes to reduce predictability. Carry money in a disguised container and have someone accompany you when possible. Do not transport money at the same time every day and do not use the same route every time. If you are making a night deposit, do not approach the deposit unless it is clear of other people. For high risk areas, or when transferring considerable amounts of cash, consider employing an armored car service.
  •    List some serial numbers from larger bills before going to the bank. Be aware of any suspicious persons lingering near the store. Call 9-1-1 if necessary.
  •    Drive or walk directly to an open business, police precinct or fire station, if you feel you are being followed while transporting money.
  •    Prepare marked money. Record non-consecutive serial numbers and series dates of five and ten-dollar bills. Do not use these bills in normal transactions; rather place the money in a till to be included in the money given to the robber. Keep the record of the marked bills in a secure location other than the till or the safe.
  •    Post store policy that no more than some pre-determined amount (often $25 to $50) is kept in the register at one time and that the store will accept no larger than $20 denominations. When the clerk receives the $20 bill it should be dropped immediately. Never place large bills in the drawer under the tray. Robbers know this practice.

Building Security and Security Devices

  •    Control access to the building. Keep all doors locked except the main entrance. Ask employees to use the main entrance.
  •    Install a lock on the back-room door that can be unlocked from the inside. Supply this room with an extra key, a phone, and a panic button. This will enable an employee to summon help if locked in during a robbery.
  •    Create a sense of territoriality. People should feel they are on your turf when they enter the store and not free to do as they wish.
  •    Install a door signaling system like a buzzer/bell. This will alert staff of new arrivals.
  •    Use signs inside and outside the store to emphasize your security policy on limited cash on hand and employee inaccessibility to the safe.
  •    Silent "hold-up" alarms should be considered. Alarm signaling devices can be installed on the floor and tripped by foot, wired to a money clip in the till, hidden under the counter or inside an office or freezer, among other possibilities.
  •    Install a "buddy alarm" system. A simple bell or buzzer connected to the neighboring business can be an effective and inexpensive "panic" alarm. It should not be hooked to lights, for a flicker could warn the robber that an alarm has been sent. It should not be loud enough to be heard by the robber. The alarm should be activated only if there is no possibility of detection. A slight movement or sound could trigger a panicking robber into violence.

Identification

  •    Greet each customer. Establish eye contact and remember their general appearance. Good customer service discourages hesitant robbers as well as other thieves. This attention to detail conveys control and puts people on notice they have been observed and can be identified later.
  •    Place height markings along the vertical frame at the entrance. This allows employees the ability to tell how tall the robber is at a glance so employees can tell at a chance how tall the robber is.
  •    Consider installing a quality video camera and recorder kept high on the wall but visible. Don't use fake cameras. Robbers know the difference. Have several cameras connected to the system, some visible, some not. Only the managers should have access to the tape.

Policy Considerations

  •    Recognize your potential of being held up.
  •    Check references of prospective employees. Do a background check of previous employers.
  •    Keep a file on all employees, including their pictures. Past employees know store procedure and where money is kept. They sometimes share this information with others who use it to plan robberies at the store. Pictures of suspects are much more useful than verbal descriptions.
  •    Re-key locks and alter safe combinations or codes when employees are dismissed for cause.
  •    Establish clear and consistent policies regarding money in the till. Establish how much money will be kept in the till, what bill denominations employees will accept, how to respond to "suspicious" inquires and how to handle loiterers. All employees should be trained and given a written description of store policy. Stress that their commitment to security procedures will reduce their risk of criminal confrontation and physical harm.
  •    Staff should never admit customers to premises after closing hours, particularly when the employee is alone. 
  •    Always maintain adequate staff levels. Be especially careful during opening and closing periods, lunch hours and holiday seasons when there is more money on the site and more distractions.
  •    Store clerks should remain alert to what is going on outside their shop. Carefully observe phone booths, parked cars with people inside and loiterers in the vicinity. Many robbers like to watch and wait for the right opportunity. If a parked car containing several people has been noticed on many occasions, get the license number and a general description of the occupants. Notify the police. A discreet investigation can be made, and no one embarrassed in case the situation is an innocent one. Be sure to notify the individual(s) following your shift of suspicious circumstances.

Leader & Mentor

Dr King Picture

In Observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Monday, January 18)

Martin Luther King, Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Since 1986, the birth date of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. has been observed as a federal holiday by the federal government. It should be a day of community and humanitarian service, and interracial cooperation.

"Life's most persistent and urgent question is: 'What are you doing for others?'" - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Given the need to continue to evolve professional policing across the nation, Dr King's words and commitment to non-violent protest are even more important today. This weekend as we celebrate Dr. Martin Lurther King Day, I remember growing up listening and watching how Dr King championed nonviolent protest. I admired the character it took to face violent responses without lashing back. Today more than ever I appreciate his commitment to this principle of nonviolence.

I am also committed to the concept that policing is a Guardianship service first. This merely means that the Parsons Police Department focuses first on being a helping agency before jumping right to our enforcement responsibilities.

Commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with service. Let us give back to our community today or find an opportunity to serve in the near future. Search for volunteer opportunities on: https://www.nationalservice.gov/serve-your-community/mlk-day-service

 


Holiday Cognition with B.F. Skinner

Holiday Cognition with B.F. Skinner

December 9, 2020

     It's the holiday season! Are my follow readers going to again become rats in the maze and respond this season to the psychological traps of the holiday with their spending? This year you can pick which psychological door you will open and follow - let's take a look at the thought processes that 20th Century psychologist B. F. Skinner brought to us.

     Will you follow the operant conditioning mode and follow the trigger of the holiday season and grab that nearest credit card? We've all learned that putting plastic cards into machines will result in goods, services and presents being deposited into our shopping carts with little concern for the unseen and mounting holiday debt. We've grown to love that conditioning.

     Other fellow shoppers will engage in reinforcement and run out to their banks looking for an increase in their line of credit hoping for a low interest rate (positive reinforcement), making the continued ability to buy, buy, buy a pleasant experience, even if only on a temporary basis.

     Not to be forgotten is our superstitious holiday shopper, could this be you?  Last year you were able to juggle credit card balances and credit limits and it worked then.  So it will of course work the same way this year . . . no reason to be like that busy squirrel in childhood cartoons who worked so hard all year saving up nuts for the winter rush. 

     Now this year we have the added community burden of COVID-19. Watching credit cards, balancing holiday gift giving against the need for having food, utilities, rent, car and cell payments is going to be even harder. If you can give, please reach out to helping agencies. If you are in need, also reach out to those same helping agencies, family, and the faith-based community.

     At the end of the holidays when January hits us hard and heavy, who will be left with the cycle of punishment if we haven't or couldn't balance our holiday needs? Skinner would have equated that to being stuck with huge credit card payments and little else left to provide the positive feeling that we bought instead of nurtured during the recent holiday cycle . . . but, heck Spring vacation is just right around the corner, along with a COVID-19 vaccine - right?


HOMICIDES IN PARSONS: A DECADE REVIEW

A recent comment in the social media universe commented about the two homicides in Parsons that occurred this year. The post complained that these homicides were a failure of your police department.

 

  •    1) The first murder occurred in February and was a domestic violence case involving two residents from Montgomery County. The male and female were passing through Parsons, the murder victim was suffocated. The suspect was arrested.
  •    2) The second case occurred in April and was a domestic related murder. The female suspect ran over the Victim (boyfriend) on US 59 south of US 400 in Parsons. The suspect was arrested.

 

Parsons violent crime rate which is lower today than in the previous years of 2017 and 2018. Felony Domestic Aggravated Assaults remain the driving force behind our community's violent crime rate.  Domestic violence is also the leading cause for homicides in Parsons for the past decade too. Last year, there were also 182 domestic violence (misdemeanor) cases. Reduce or eliminate domestic violence in Parsons and our crime rate plummets.

 

Nationwide only 61% of all murders are solved. Over the past decade 100% of the homicides investigated by Parsons PD have been solved.

 

There is one case that we partnered with the Kansas Bureau of Investigation (KBI) the occurred in mid-2018 which has been assigned to them as the lead agency. That case is an active and viable investigation being handled by KBI.

 

  •     In 2010, there were two murders one in June and one in September. One was drug related and the other involved a family member (domestic related). Arrests were made in both.
  •     In 2011, a juvenile was murdered by a known individual who was the Victim's mother's boyfriend (domestic related). An arrest was made.
  •     In 2013, a multiple murder resulted in the arrest of an individual who had been a stalker. An arrest was made with Parsons PD partnering with KBI.
  •     In 2015, there were two murders that resulted in arrests. One incident was drug related and the other was domestic connected.
  •     In 2017, there was a domestic related homicide that resulted in an arrest.
  •     In 2018, this murder case is being handled by KBI and remains an open and viable investigation.
  •     In 2019, a Suspect committed suicide after a domestic related homicide.
  •     In 2020, as listed above both homicides were domestic related with arrests made in both cases.

 

Domestic violence whether a misdemeanor battery, a felony aggravated assault or a domestic related homicide are tuff crimes to think that law enforcement on our own can prevent. These are crimes that require community investment.

 

The Center for Problem Oriented Policing (POP) has a useful booklet on Domestic Violence that you can download at:

 

https://popcenter.asu.edu/sites/default/files/domestic_violence.pdf

 

The police and fire departments are working to create a Public Safety Advisory Board that Fire Chief Ward and I are working to create. This advisory board will provide input to our Departments and partner with us to identify community challenges to work on. You will hear more about this in the coming weeks.

 

To learn more about how a community can reduce domestic violence visit the following web sites:

 

https://www.cdc.gov/injury/features/intimate-partner-violence/index.html

 

https://www.domesticshelters.org/articles/ending-domestic-violence/10-ways-you-can-help-prevent-domestic-violence-where-you-live

 

https://www.theduluthmodel.org/stop-violence-community/

 

Robert Spinks, MA, MS

Chief - Parsons Police Department

www.parsonspd.com

See It!  Hear It!  Report It!


Is Crime Major or Minor?

Violent Crime: Is Crime Major or Minor?

By Chief Robert Spinks, Parsons Police  10/19/2020

When was the last time you saw or heard about a purse snatcher, a robbery, or a violent assault in Parsons?

The FBI uses a measure of Murder, Rape, Robbery and Aggravated Assaults to create a community's violate crime data. By dividing the population into the number of these select id grouped crimes (violent crime) you can create a 'crime rate.'

Interesting, but violent crime must be rampant in Parsons since we hear that on social media. Right?

Wrong!

Every community is unique. Every city wrestles with its own demons. By far the largest demon in Parsons is felony domestic assaults. If that single crime was eliminated, then our community's violent crime plunges.

Certainly, any crime, violent or persons based, or property is too much, especially if you are the victim.

4.5% of the 16,202 incidents that Parsons Police responded to in 2019 involved an incident defined as a violent crime by the FBI.

Parsons dirty secret is that our worst crime occurs not on our streets or alleys, in dark parks or school campuses. The crimes of felony domestic assault (53) and misdemeanor domestic violence (182) as well as rape (8) and even murder (1) have a common thread of partner abuse.

But what about drugs, shootings in the street, and mayhem?

Mayhem is not Parsons. Yes, SE Kansas has long been plagued by illegal drugs - though less than in the glory days of meth and backyard meth labs of a decade ago. Drugs to bring armed confrontation.

The largest issue is that the police continue to make arrests at a substantive rate. Not every crime is solved, but our rate of solvability usually hovers at twice the national average. Last year 671 criminals were booked into the Parsons lock-up serving over 3,000-man days, with many then headed to the Labette County Jail.

But you cannot arrest a community out of crime. Every arrest that is made is a community failure. An arrest is the last option society has to try and remove someone from circulation. But about 98% of all arrestees and incarcerated folks in prison eventually return to local streets.

If socio-economic woes, lack of education, inadequate mental health and helping services as well as safety nets that also include the faith-based community aren't available or have huge holes in their net then we will continue to see revolving doors of victimization.

2019 FBI defined Violent Crime (73 Violent Crimes or 1 every 5 days) :

1 Murder

8 Rapes

9 Robberies

55 Aggravated Assaults

 


HALLOWEEN SAFETY TIPS

Halloween is right around the corner! Kids love this holiday because they can dress up and get free candy! Let us help your kids have some good Halloween memories with a few safety tips.

Some of you kids already know things that you can do to be safe, like how to cross the street, not to talk to or go with strangers and things like that. However, we adults know how exciting Halloween can be and sometimes you forget to be careful.

Halloween Graphic 1.jpg

Here are some tips that we have just for you kids, to help keep you safe on Halloween night.

  • Avoid trick-or-treating alone. Walk in groups or with a trusted adult.
  • Plan a trick-or-treating route in familiar neighborhoods with well-lit streets.
  • Hold a flashlight while trick-or-treating to help you see and others see you. WALK and don't run from house to house.
  • Only walk on sidewalks whenever possible, or on the far edge of the road facing traffic to stay safe.
  • Be careful when you cross a street. Make sure to look in both directions and make sure that there are no cars coming. If you have a little brother or sister with you, take their hand and help them get across the street, too. If the street has a stop light, wait until the cross walk light tells you that it is okay to cross now, but still check before you cross, look both ways.
  • Choose bright costumes, and have children carry flashlights or glow sticks so they are easily visible. (Hint - Try adding reflective tape to costumes and candy bags!)
  • Never, ever go into a strangers house or even ring their door for treats unless your parents are with you and say that it's okay.
  • Always walk younger children to the door to receive treats.
  • Be sure children do not approach any vehicle, occupied or not, unless you are with them.
  • Never accept rides from strangers.
  • Examine all treats for choking hazards and tampering before eating them. Limit the amount of treats you eat.
  • Eat only factory-wrapped treats. Avoid eating homemade treats made by strangers.
  • Make sure children know your cellphone number, their home telephone number, and address in case you are separated.
  • Consider giving them a cellphone so they can reach you easily.
  • Teach children how to call 911 in an emergency.

Teach children to say "NO!" in a loud voice if someone tries to get them to go somewhere, accept anything other than a treat, or leave with them. Tell them to try everything they can to escape, including yelling, hitting, and kicking.

 

Parsons Police wishes that you have a safe and happy Halloween!

 


New Chief's Corner Blog

We are excited about this new feature to the website. Please check back often for thoughts and information from Chief Spinks.


New Parsons Police Dept. Blog Coming Soon

Please check back soon to see our new website blog!